News & Events Updates

WALKING TOUR OF INWOOD More
Crown Heights South, part 2 More
Crown Heights South, part 1 More

From the Neighborhoods

Proposed 23-story tower from Ft. Tryon Park. 4650 Broadway visibility study by Saratoga Associates

Proposed 23-story tower from Ft. Tryon Park. 4650 Broadway visibility study by Saratoga Associates

The Historic Districts Council chose Inwood as one of the Six to Celebrate neighborhoods in 2011 for its historical, architectural and environmental attributes. Nearly half of the land in Inwood is public park space which preserves natural terrain and geological features of Manhattan, as opposed to the designed landscapes of many parks in New York City. Thus, Inwood’s distinctive development pattern and architecture was created in relation to the original landscape of Manhattan Island.

One of Inwood and Washington Heights’ treasured historical resources is Fort Tryon Park, a 67-acre park which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is one of only ten Scenic Landmarks in all of New York City.  Designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr. the park’s landscape is unrivaled in its romantic views of the Hudson River, the Palisades, and its rich topography.

However, the super-tall development found in other parts of the city has arrived above 200th Street in Manhattan in this low-scale neighborhood. Ft. Tryon Park and the Inwood community is currently threatened by two rezonings which will irreversibly alter the experience of the park and the neighborhood at large.  The proposed rezoning for 4650 Broadway will be a 27-story building abutting the park, four times taller than the surrounding buildings’ heights. The other proposal, 4566 Broadway, would allow a 19-story development (increase in FAR from 3.44 to 9.96).

Click here to send a letter saying “NO” to spot-rezoning and require an Environmental Impact Study (EIS) of the cumulative impacts of these projects, and undertake a comprehensive plan to develop appropriately scaled development, similar to the City’s InwoodNYC plan immediately to the north.

 

Saturday, May 7 at 9:00AM:        Inwood

Join Pat Courtney Inwood resident, founder of Volunteers for Isham Park and and HDC board memeber and Tim Frasca member of Transportation Alternatives for a Jane’s Walk focused on the design history of Inwood, the community at the northern tip of Manhattan. The tour will also highlight potential changes to its cohesive Art Deco streetscapes and WPA-funded park spaces, as well as proposed improvements to the existing street infrastructure.

Free- registration required
Click here for more information and to register


Saturday, May 14 at 10:00AM:    Richmond Hill

Join architect and president of the Richmond Hill Historical Society, Ivan Mrakovčić, for an informative walking tour of the historical and architectural significance of this planned suburban community in Queens. The tour will include examples of Richmond Hill’s Victorian-era architectural legacy: all situated in beautiful tree-lined streets in proximity to the south slope of Forest Park.

Click here to register 


 

Sunday, May 15 at 10:30AM:       The Upper East Side’s Czechoslovak Heritage

Until the 1940s, a portion of First Avenue was known as “Bohemian Broadway”, heart of the area that was home to tens of thousands of Bohemian, Moravian, and Slovak immigrants who started to settle on the Upper East Side in the late 19th Century. Join Joe Svehlak, tour guide and Czech-American, to hear about the Czech and Slovak immigrant experience, and see important remnants of this once vibrant community, including St. John Nepomucene Church, Jan Hus Presbyterian Church, Bohemian National Hall, and the gymnastic society’s Sokol Hall.

Friends/ Seniors $10
General Admission $20
Click here to register 


Saturday, June 4 at 10:00AM:    East New York

East New York has certainly been the talk of the town lately, as the City moves forward to rezone the neighborhood, along with 14 others. However, East New York is also known for its rich and somewhat troubled history.  Join Farrah Lafontant, long-term resident of East New York and member of Preserving East New York, the newly formed civic group working to preserve the neighborhood’s built heritage, as she leads us on a journey to learn why East New York has always been a neighborhood with great moxie! The tour will begin at the Holy Trinity Russian Orthodox Church and include visits to a Magistrates Court, the former site of the East New York Savings Bank, Maxwell’s Bakery and the Borden Dairy Company factory complex, which was recently placed on the Landmarks Commission’s calendar for potential landmark status.

Friends/ Seniors $10
General Admission $20
Click here to register 


 

Thursday, June 16 at 6:00PM:     How Audubon Park Disrupted Manhattan’s Grid

The distinctive footprint that disrupts Manhattan’s grid west of Broadway between 155th and 158th Streets—the Audubon Park Historic District—did not come about by accident or from the demands of local topography. It unfolded from careful planning and alliances among like-minded property owners, whose social and political connections ensured that when progress swept up Manhattan’s west side, they would benefit. Take a leisurely walk with local historian Matthew Spady through the architectural gems in today’s Audubon Park Historic district and the proposed expansion area and learn about the Grinnell family, who controlled this neighborhood’s rapid evolution from suburb to city at the turn of the twentieth century.

Friends/ Seniors $10
General Admission $20
Click here to register 


Thursday, June 23 at 6:00PM:     Crown Heights South, part 1

Saturday, June 25 at 10:00AM:   Crown Heights South, part 2

Crown Heights South, on the southern side of Eastern Parkway, has fascinating streetscapes and a great history. Sandwiched between the 19th century communities of Bedford and Flatbush, Crown Heights South developed primarily between 1900 and 1930 as a fine residential neighborhood with a unique mixture of mansions, rowhouses and apartment buildings. Mixed in are large, important educational institutions, an armory, theaters, and on its southern border, the site of Ebbetts Field and the remains of one of the area’s most popular breweries. Bedford Avenue, once famous as Brooklyn’s Automobile Row, bisects the neighborhood, and forms a boundary for our two-part tour. Part One features the mansions of Doctor’s Row, fine rowhouse blocks, apartment building and cultural institutions. Part Two takes us to the western end of the neighborhood, where big buildings abound. The tours will be led by Suzanne Spellen, a recipient of a 2015 Historic Districts Council Grassroots Award and the writer of the “Montrose Morris” columns on Brownstoner.com.

Friends/ Seniors $10
General Admission $20
Click here to register for part one 
Click here to register for part two

 

 

Join us at this meeting to learn what we are doing and how you can help.

Representatives from the Historic Districts Council will discuss the architectural, cultural and economic benefits of historic districts and address misconceptions about the impacts of designation on operating and repair costs.

Come and meet your neighbors as we help our community.